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Facebook Is Secretly Building A Phone

21 Sep

Facebook is building a mobile phone, says a source who has knowledge of the project. Or rather, they’re building the software for the phone and working with a third party to actually build the hardware. Which is exactly what Apple and everyone else does, too. It was a little less than a year ago that we broke the news that Google was working on a phone of its own – which was eventually revealed as the Nexus One. It was about that time, says out source, that Facebook first became concerned about the increasing power of the iPhone and Android platforms. And that awesome Facebook apps for those phones may not be enough to counter a long term competitive threat. Specifically, Facebook wants to integrate deeply into the contacts list and other core functions of the phone. It can only do that if it controls the operating system. Two high level Facebook employees – Joe Hewitt and Matthew Papakipos – are said to be secretly working on the project, which is unknown even to most Facebook staff. Both have deep operating system experience. Hewitt helped create the Firefox browser and was working on Parakey before it was acquired by Facebook in 2007. Parakey, which never launched, was described as a “Web-based operating system.” Hewitt also created all of Facebook’s iPhone web apps and then native apps, but finally quit building for the iPhone in disgust late last year. But he knows operating systems and he knows mobile. Papakipos also has a perfect background for this project. He was leading the Google Chrome OS project until June. He then quit and went to Facebook. Papakipos is considered a rockstar developer, and there are any number of jobs he’d be able to do at Facebook. But that doesn’t answer the question of why he’d leave the Chrome OS project before it was finished. It would have taken something really interesting to lure him away. Something like a Facebook Phone, for example. So what might this phone look and feel like? We don’t know yet. When will it be announced? Don’t know. But I’d speculate that it would be a lower end phone, something very affordable, that lets people fully integrate into their Facebook world. You call your friend’s name, not some ancient seven digit code, for example. I’d imagine Facebook wanting these things to get into as many hands as possible, so I’d expect a model at a less than $50 price. Pay your bill with Facebook Credits. Etc. As for timing, the holiday season is always a good time to launch new products. But that may be too soon. Or who knows, the whole project might get killed before it sees light. All we know for sure is that Hewitt and Papakipos are working on something very stealthy together. And we have a source that tells us that stealthy thing is a Facebook phone. We’re also not discounting possible partnerships around this. Spotify was said to be working on a phone with INQ last year based on a shared investor, Li Ka-Shing. It turns out Li Ka-Shing is also a sizeable investor in Facebook. So an INQ/Facebook partnership on a phone certainly wouldn’t be a surprise.

Download Ultra Surf(Proxy Server Software) from LimeLinx

17 Sep

下载超冲浪代理服务器软件

Download Link

NASA to Launch Scramjets From Scramsleds

15 Sep

NASA

Different technologies to push a spacecraft down a long rail have been tested in several settings, including this Magnetic Levitation (MagLev) System evaluated at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center.

NASA‘s next potential space project seems ripped straight from science fiction novels — a horizontal aircraft launcher for the space agency’s supersonic air-breathing jets.

Early mockups of the Advanced Space Launch System feature a wedge-shaped aircraft with so-called “scramjet” engines; such engines work by taking in air, mixing it with hydrogen and simultaneously compressing it. The process generates extremely high temperatures that ignite the mixture to create a surge of jet propulsion.

The vision: a horizontally launched craft that takes off at Mach 10 along an electrified track similar to those used on roller coasters. Upon return, the aircraft would be able to land directly onto a runway. And according to NASA, it’s very much within reach.

“All of these are technology components that have already been developed or studied,” said Stan Star, NASA’s branch chief of the Applied Physics Laboratory at Kennedy. “We’re just proposing to mature these technologies to a useful level, well past the level they’ve already been taken.”

As far as the aircraft that would launch on the rail, there already are real-world tests for designers to draw on. The X-43A, or Hyper-X program, and X-51 have shown that scramjets will work and can achieve remarkable speeds.

Development and furthering these existing cutting-edge technologies would have numerous social benefits as well, the space agency argues, such as longer lasting batteries and more efficient railway systems.

Given the commercial potential, the project could set the stage for a commercial launch program. Moreover, many of the necessary technologies are already at a relatively advanced level. The current plan proposes flights within the next 10 years, starting with unmanned drones.

While the launch system isn’t intended to replace the current means for launching spacecraft, it could easily be adapted to accommodate astronauts, Starr said.

“It’s not very often you get to work on a major technology revolution,” Starr said.

What’s with Google Instant?

15 Sep

If you have been surfing the web, chances are you have tried ‘search engines’, be it Yahoo, Bing or Google. Looking for something you need would be a lot easier if you use a search engine like the ones that I just mentioned. Given this reality, the battle for search engine supremacy has been going for quite some time. It seems Google is winning the fight, but don’t count Bing and Yahoo out yet.

The challenge right now is not only to provide the right information for every search but to provide them in a much faster way, not to mention of course relative information. The key is to provide what the user needs, the right information and the fastest way. Now that’s a challenge really. That is why Google recently launched ‘Google Instant”, a new search enhancement that shows results as you type.

The idea is to that users get to the right content much faster than before because they don’t have to finish typing their full search term, or even press ‘search,’” Google said. “Another shift is that seeing results as they type helps them formulate a better search term by providing instant feedback. Users can now adapt their search on the fly until the results match exactly what they want. In time, we may wonder how search ever worked in any other way.”

The new “Instant Search’ recently introduced means people would start to see an ever-evolving set of results in the middle of the page with each character they type into the search box.

Google Instant search could grow beyond the Web

14 Sep

 

The new Google Instant search reveals streaming Web search results as fast as you type. As awesome as the concept might be, though, the results are confined to the Web. Google has the elements–combining Google Instant with Google Desktop –to develop a universal search capability that can drastically improve productivity.

Marissa Mayer, VP Search Products & User Experience for Google describes the advantages of Google Instant in a blog post. “The user benefits of Google Instant are many–but the primary one is time saved. Our testing has shown that Google Instant saves the average searcher two to five seconds per search. That may not seem like a lot at first, but it adds up. With Google Instant, we estimate that we’ll save our users 11 hours with each passing second!”

Related story

Google experiments could limit competition for top search results

That sounds fairly impressive, but how many Web searches does an average user conduct per day? I might search the Web five or ten times a day, but I make my living on the Internet, so I might not be a valid use case. Still, assuming Google Instant can save me three seconds per search, I would save 30 seconds per day, or two and a half minutes per work week–totaling just over two hours a year of time saved.

Granted, that is nothing to sneeze at–especially for large organizations with thousands of employees each saving two hours per year. However, Web search is already pretty snappy, and between Google and Bing I can generally find what I am looking for pretty quick. Finding local data is often a different story, though.

The concept of search at the speed of type isn’t new. It’s just new to Google Web search. X1 provides instant search results from e-mail, file attachments, local files, calendar events, contacts, archived e-mail, and remote data stores like file servers and Microsoft SharePoint data. Microsoft has a similar search capability built in to Windows 7. The problem with these desktop search capabilities is that they don’t include Web search results.

Google Desktop offers comparable local search of e-mail, files, music, photos, chats, Gmail, and previously viewed Web pages, but not the current Web at large. Basically, if a user wants to find a good template for creating a spreadsheet to track project expenses, she will have to conduct separate searches of local data and the Web and correlate the information to find the best option.

What if Google were to combine Google Instant with Google Desktop, though, and create Google Universal? Now, that is an application that can really boost productivity. Google Instant and Google Desktop are both great tools, but a search bar that predictively streams instant results from both the Web and local data stores in a single interface would enable users to function more efficiently and effectively.

Expert Review for The iPod touch

14 Sep

New iPod touch

The iPod touch has been the most popular iPod for Apple. In fact, it has been the most popular product for Apple, a title that was previously held by the nano. People seem to have taken very well to the touch, a device that offered them all the iOS goodness of the iPhone without the phone (and contract). It has been a huge success as a gaming platform too, selling more than the number of handheld consoles that Nintendo and Sony sell combined, with 50 percent of worldwide market share. So how can you make something so great even better?

Well, the first thing that Apple probably has in mind when making newer versions of existing products is how they can make it smaller. The older iPod touch was impossibly thin. They just couldn’t make it any thinner. But that’s what we think. To prove us wrong, Apple has done just that. Not only did they make it thinner they also added in more stuff to it, including two cameras, one of which records in HD!

The older iPod touch was 8.5mm ‘thick’, while the new one is just 7.2mm. When you look at that figure and what all Apple has added in the new touch, you realize that Apple’s engineers are a different breed of people, capable of bending the laws of physics in a way that a common man cannot even comprehend (nor can the engineers of other companies for that matter).

There are five major additions to the new touch. First is the Retina display, which debuted on the iPhone 4. It’s 960 x 640 pixels, which is four times the resolution of the older iPod touch displays and since the size has remained unchanged at 3.5-inches, it has an amazing pixel density of 326 ppi, which is the highest for any mobile device, so high that you cannot see individual pixels with the naked eye.

The second addition is the A4 chip, same as the one found on the iPhone 4. Rumored to be clocked at around 1GHz, the new chip will make the iPod touch much faster and will also significantly improve the gaming experience as now the developers can make more detailed and high quality games knowing that the processor is fast enough to handle them.

Another thing that will make gaming better is the addition of a gyroscope, which is the third important addition. The three-axis gyroscope will make motion based gaming a lot more precise, while adding new ways to control the games.

The next important feature is the addition of a front video camera. It can record videos and images in VGA resolution. With it you can make FaceTime calls with people using the new iPod touch as well the iPhone 4.  

The last major addition is the camera on the back of the device. With it the new iPod touch can record videos in 720p resolution at up to 30 frames per second and also take pictures in 960 x 720 resolution. Just like on the iPhone 4 the rear camera can be used during a FaceTime call to show the person on the other side what you are looking at. You can geo-tag the images using Wi-Fi. Whether the camera on the back supports autofocus or not is not mentioned. However, my guess is, it doesn’t. But for such a thin device, it is a miracle they managed to put in a camera capable of recording HD videos.

Visually, you will notice that the back is now completely flat and not curved as on the older model. Also, the tiny spot on the top left, which was the Wi-Fi antenna, has now disappeared and one wonders where Apple could have relocated it. I guess we will have to wait for iFixit’s teardown for that. Apart from that the new touch is identical to the older model.

The battery life on the new model is rated at 40 hours for audio and 7 hours for video, which is longer by 10 for audio and 1 hour for video than the older model. This, despite the thinner size and added battery-consuming features. It’s sorcery, I tell you!

The new iPod touch will be sold in three capacities; 8GB, 32GB and 64GB models, and unlike the previous generation, this time it seems they all will get the same hardware. They will be priced at Rs. 15,400, Rs. 19,900 and Rs. 25,900 respectively.

The Good:

  • It’s impossibly thin
  • Retina display
  • A4 processor
  • 3-axis gyroscope
  • Front VGA camera for FaceTime
  • Rear camera for recording HD videos and stills
  • Improved battery life, despite all the above additions and size reduction!
  • There is still a loudspeaker somewhere in there 
  • Did I mention how thin it is?

The Bad:

  • Only 256MB of RAM
  • Display does not use an IPS panel like the iPhone 4
  • 64GB is still the maximum limit
  • An FM radio would have been nice
  • No autofocus for the rear camera, and low resolution still image capture

Expert Review for The iPod nano

14 Sep

iPod nano

The iPod nano’s design has more or less been the same ever since it was launched. They may not look identical but it has always looked like a slimmed down iPod classic. This year, however, Apple gave the nano its biggest design change ever.

Enter the touch screen. Yes, the multi-touch, capacitive touch screen has finally made its way into the cheaper iPods and the nano is the first and perhaps the only iPod to get it. Since the click wheel is gone, the nano is much smaller than before, 46 percent smaller and 42 percent lighter to be precise. All you see in the front now is the 1.54-inch display with a resolution of 240 x 240 pixels. The new nano is now closer than ever to matching the definition of its name.

On the top of the nano you will find the sleep/wake and volume buttons, and on the bottom is the dock connector and the earphone jack. On the back is a clip, so you can attach it to your shirt or bag. Visually, the new nano looks almost exactly like the shuffle, except it has a touchscreen instead of buttons and a dock connector.

The interface of the new nano is based on the iOS devices. You will see four icons at a time on the screen and to see more you need to swipe left. To get back you swipe right and to jump to the first screen you press and hold anywhere on the screen. You can rearrange the icons on the screen any time. Just press and hold on the icons until it jiggles and then move it to wherever you want. You can also rotate the orientation of the display by just using your two fingers on the screen and doing a twisting gesture. I wonder why one has to do this manually though; why can’t the accelerometer do it on its own?

When you go into the music playback screen, you will see that the album art takes the entire screen in the background. On the front you will see the track info on the top, the playback buttons in the middle. To get more options such as repeat, shuffle or Genius, just swipe left on the screen to get them.

The new iPod nano comes with a built-in FM radio (with Live Pause) and can also display photos. However, due to the smaller display size video playback is no longer an option. This is a major omission compared to the previous generation model, which cannot playback video but also record it using its built-in camera.  

Other features include shake to shuffle and a pedometer for fitness freaks as well as support for the Nike + iPod Sport Kit. The new nano will be available in six colors, plus a (PRODUCT) RED version, available exclusively through the iTunes Store. The battery life is rated at 24 hours for audio playback, which is the same as the previous generation models. The new nano will be sold in two capacities, 8GB and 16GB for Rs. 10,700 and Rs. 12,700.

The Good:

  • Really small
  • Multi-touch display
  • Interface looks well designed
  • Built-in clip
  • Only iPod to have built-in FM radio

The Bad:

  • The screen looks bit too small
  • No more video recording and playback

Apple WiFi iPad due in China on September 17

14 Sep

Apple has announced the availability of WiFi iPad tablets in China from September 17. That does sound a bit surprising as  Apple products like iPod, iPhone, iPod touch and even iPad are assembled in China itself. Still, the democratic nation doesn’t get any brownie points for the same. The Cupertino based company hasn’t disclosed if the WiFi+3G iPad models would be made available in China’s Apple Stores and Apple Authorized Resellers.

The iPad tablet has surely created enough craze amongst consumers to at least think about owning a tablet if not the costly iPad itself. Its 9.7-inch IPS panel technology sporting LCD panel brings multi-touch support and has fingerprint resistant oleophobic coating. Housing a 1GHz Apple A4 processor and 256MB RAM, the iPad lets users watch movies, photos and read ebooks using the iBooks app.

Apple will sell WiFi iPad models at following prices in China:

  • 16GB iPad – CNY 3988
  • 32GB iPad – CNY 4788
  • 64GB iPad – CNY 5588

Apple has been reportedly working on the next generation iPad with faster CPU and more RAM. The company will certainly make the first generation iPad available worldwide before that. More countries will get iPad models later this year along country-specific pricing.  

Apple may release a FaceTime-capable iPad before Christmas

14 Sep

 

According to a report by AppleInsider, sources with direct knowledge of Apple’s product plans claim that production of a FaceTime-capable iPad could be available in time for the holiday shopping season.

Although Apple has maintained a fairly predictable 12-month release cycle for its mobile devices, the source claims “that as of last month, there was an ambitious push inside Apple to verify the refresh for a possible launch ahead of this year’s holiday shopping season.

Typically Apple will release updates to its iPod lineup in September (as we saw last week) and then update its Mac lineup shortly thereafter. Should this latest claim pan out, recent rumors about Apple wanting to ramp iPad production to around 3 million units a month may have actually been misinterpreted and the production increase may have been due to this rumored version.

In any case, including a front-facing video camera on the iPad is definitely the next move on Apple’s mobile list. With the three major mobile devices in Apple’s lineup (iPhone 4, iPod touch, and iPad) offering FaceTime and if rumored FaceTime-compatible software for Mac and Windows shows up, Apple will effectively put its name into any conversation regarding major communications companies.

The biggest question at this point is not whether Apple will release an iPad with a FaceTime-capable front-facing video camera, but rather when.

Apple’s Review Guidelines: ‘We Don’t Need Any More Fart Apps’

10 Sep

Apple for the first time has published its App Store Review Guidelines — helping to demystify a process that puzzled and sometimes infuriated developers making apps for the iPhone and iPad. Digits pored through a copy of the guidelines, which are wonderfully blunt and descriptive. Highlights are below, with the full text at the bottom of this post. Enjoy!

“We view Apps different than books or songs, which we do not curate. If you want to criticize a religion, write a book. If you want to describe sex, write a book or a song, or create a medical app.”

Well, this is an interesting distinction. Plenty of developers and tech watchers have complained about Apple “censorship,” although Apple has the right to regulate what’s in its store, just as Wal-Mart chooses which toothpaste to display. Apple seems to be saying that it views apps as a core part of its brand, rather than simply things that are delivered over its systems.

***

“We have over 250,000 apps in the App Store. We don’t need any more Fart apps. If your app doesn’t do something useful or provide some form of lasting entertainment, it may not be accepted.”

“If your App looks like it was cobbled together in a few days, or you’re trying to get your first practice App into the store to impress your friends, please brace yourself for rejection. We have lots of serious developers who don’t want their quality Apps to be surrounded by amateur hour.”

These sounds like things that Steve Jobs has said repeatedly. Just this month, he made the same reference — to “amateur hour” — when talking about what consumers don’t want to see on Internet television. At the time, it sounded like a reference to Google’s YouTube and perhaps its upcoming Google TV, which wouldn’t be surprising given that Jobs has slammed app offerings on Google’s uncurated Android platform before. But the comment also makes clear that Apple believes the app market is growing up. The original fart apps might have made it in, but that’s not what people want anymore.

***

“We will reject Apps for any content or behavior that we believe is over the line. What line, you ask? Well, as a Supreme Court Justice once said, “I’ll know it when I see it”. And we think that you will also know it when you cross it.”

Jobs has also said Android has “a porn store.” So clearly porn is a no-no. That said, this guideline is sure to rile up developers who want to sell, say, sexy apps. And it’s a codification of what we knew all along: Sometimes these things are just a judgment call by someone at Apple. Writing down rules doesn’t change that.

***

“If your app is rejected, we have a Review Board that you can appeal to. If you run to the press and trash us, it never helps.”

Well, it helps if you talk to the press and you happen to have won a Pulitzer Prize for cartooning. Apple has a love-hate relationship with tech blogs in particular, it’s true. And nobody likes being trashed. But one has to wonder how much the public complaining by developers prompted this document — in which case, maybe it does help.

***

“This is a living document, and new apps presenting new questions may result in new rules at any time. Perhaps your app will trigger this.”

Developers: It’s important to remember that this is still Apple’s world, and you’re just living in it.

***

2.1 Apps that crash will be rejected
2.2
 Apps that exhibit bugs will be rejected
2.3
 Apps that do not perform as advertised by the developer will be rejected

Many of the rules are obvious, like those above. And more are rather technical. But others are interesting because they mention rules that had been assumed but not confirmed before, or because they make you wonder just what kinds of apps people are trying to submit.

***

10.4
 Apps that create alternate desktop/home screen environments or simulate multi-app widget experiences will be rejected
10.5 
Apps that alter the functions of standard switches, such as the Volume Up/Down and Ring/Silent switches, will be rejected

These, as John Gruber at Daring Fireball points out, have previously been enforced, but Apple hadn’t confirmed them.

***

“14.1 
Any app that is defamatory, offensive, mean-spirited, or likely to place the targeted individual or group in harms way will be rejected”
“14.2
 Professional political satirists and humorists are exempt from the ban on offensive or mean-spirited commentary”

See the comment about Pulitzer Prize-winning cartoonists, above.

***

15.1 
Apps portraying realistic images of people or animals being killed or maimed, shot, stabbed, tortured or injured will be rejected
15.2
 Apps that depict violence or abuse of children will be rejected
15.3 
”Enemies” within the context of a game cannot solely target a specific race, culture, a real government or corporation, or any other real entity
15.4
 Apps involving realistic depictions of weapons in such a way as to encourage illegal or reckless use of such weapons will be rejected
15.5
 Apps that include games of Russian roulette will be rejected

Digits accepts that people are crazy and do strange things. But has someone submitted a Russian roulette app? That seems like an awfully specific rule.

***

17.1
 Apps cannot transmit data about a user without obtaining the user’s prior permission and providing the user with access to information about how and where the data will be used
17.2
 Apps that require users to share personal information, such as email address and date of birth, in order to function will be rejected
17.3
 Apps that target minors for data collection will be rejected

The above are interesting for those keen on privacy — although it’s still important to note that many users don’t bother to read such privacy information. It’s something that Apple has been struggling with, particularly when it comes to location information.

***

18.2
 Apps that contain user generated content that is frequently pornographic (ex “Chat Roulette” apps) will be rejected

The rules don’t frequently mention a type of app by name. The folks at Apple must have gotten a lot of submissions for Chat Roulette apps and been annoyed.

***

Full Text

Introduction
We’re thrilled that you want to invest your talents and time to develop applications for iOS. It has been a rewarding experience – both professionally and financially – for tens of thousands of developers and we want to help you join this successful group. This is the first time we have published our App Store Review Guidelines. We hope they will help you steer clear of issues as you develop your app, so that it speeds through the approval process when you submit it.

We view Apps different than books or songs, which we do not curate. If you want to criticize a religion, write a book. If you want to describe sex, write a book or a song, or create a medical app. It can get complicated, but we have decided to not allow certain kinds of content in the App Store. It may help to keep some of our broader themes in mind:

▪ We have lots of kids downloading lots of apps, and parental controls don’t work unless the parents set them up (many don’t). So know that we’re keeping an eye out for the kids.
▪ We have over 250,000 apps in the App Store. We don’t need any more Fart apps. If your app doesn’t do something useful or provide some form of lasting entertainment, it may not be accepted.
▪ If your App looks like it was cobbled together in a few days, or you’re trying to get your first practice App into the store to impress your friends, please brace yourself for rejection. We have lots of serious developers who don’t want their quality Apps to be surrounded by amateur hour.
▪ We will reject Apps for any content or behavior that we believe is over the line. What line, you ask? Well, as a Supreme Court Justice once said, “I’ll know it when I see it”. And we think that you will also know it when you cross it.
▪ If your app is rejected, we have a Review Board that you can appeal to. If you run to the press and trash us, it never helps.
▪ This is a living document, and new apps presenting new questions may result in new rules at any time. Perhaps your app will trigger this.

Lastly, we love this stuff too, and honor what you do. We’re really trying our best to create the best platform in the world for you to express your talents and make a living too. If it sounds like we’re control freaks, well, maybe it’s because we’re so committed to our users and making sure they have a quality experience with our products. Just like almost all of you are too.

Table of Contents
1. Terms and conditions
2. Functionality
3. Metadata, ratings and rankings
4. Location
5. Push notifications
6. Game Center
7. iAds
8. Trademarks and trade dress
9. Media content
10. User interface
11. Purchasing and currencies
12. Scraping and aggregation
13. Damage to device
14. Personal attacks
15. Violence
16. Objectionable content
17. Privacy
18. Pornography
19. Religion, culture, and ethnicity
20. Contests, sweepstakes, lotteries, and raffles
21. Charities and contributions
22. Legal requirements

1. Terms and conditions
1.1 
As a developer of applications for the App Store you are bound by the terms of the Program License Agreement (PLA), Human Interface Guidelines (HIG), and any other licenses or contracts between you and Apple. The following rules and examples are intended to assist you in gaining acceptance for your app in the App Store, not to amend or remove provisions from any other agreement.
2. Functionality
2.1 
Apps that crash will be rejected
2.2
 Apps that exhibit bugs will be rejected
2.3
 Apps that do not perform as advertised by the developer will be rejected
2.4
 Apps that include undocumented or hidden features inconsistent with the description of the app will be rejected
2.5
 Apps that use non-public APIs will be rejected
2.6
 Apps that read or write data outside its designated container area will be rejected
2.7 
Apps that download code in any way or form will be rejected
2.8
 Apps that install or launch other executable code will be rejected
2.9
 Apps that are “beta”, “demo”, “trial”, or “test” versions will be rejected
2.10
 iPhone apps must also run on iPad without modification, at iPhone resolution, and at 2X iPhone 3GS resolution
2.11
 Apps that duplicate apps already in the App Store may be rejected, particularly if there are many of them
2.12 
Apps that are not very useful or do not provide any lasting entertainment value may be rejected
2.13 
Apps that are primarily marketing materials or advertisements will be rejected
2.14 
Apps that are intended to provide trick or fake functionality that are not clearly marked as such will be rejected
2.15
 Apps larger than 20MB in size will not download over cellular networks (this is automatically prohibited by the App Store)
2.16
 Multitasking apps may only use background services for their intended purposes: VoIP, audio playback, location, task completion, local notifications, etc
2.17 
Apps that browse the web must use the iOS WebKit framework and WebKit Javascript
2.18 
Apps that encourage excessive consumption of alcohol or illegal substances, or encourage minors to consume alcohol or smoke cigarettes, will be rejected
2.19
 Apps that provide incorrect diagnostic or other inaccurate device data will be rejected
2.20 
Developers “spamming” the App Store with many versions of similar apps will be removed from the iOS Developer Program
3. Metadata (name, descriptions, ratings, rankings, etc)
3.1 
Apps with metadata that mentions the name of any other mobile platform will be rejected
3.2
 Apps with placeholder text will be rejected
3.3 
Apps with descriptions not relevant to the application content and functionality will be rejected
3.4
 App names in iTunes Connect and as displayed on a device should be similar, so as not to cause confusion
3.5 
Small and large app icons should be similar, so as to not to cause confusion
3.6
 Apps with app icons and screenshots that do not adhere to the 4+ age rating will be rejected
3.7
 Apps with Category and Genre selections that are not appropriate for the app content will be rejected
3.8
 Developers are responsible for assigning appropriate ratings to their apps. Inappropriate ratings may be changed by Apple
3.9 
Developers are responsible for assigning appropriate keywords for their apps. Inappropriate keywords may be changed/deleted by Apple
3.10
 Developers who attempt to manipulate or cheat the user reviews or chart ranking in the App Store with fake or paid reviews, or any other inappropriate methods will be removed from the iOS Developer Program
4. Location
4.1
Apps that do not notify and obtain user consent before collecting, transmitting, or using location data will be rejected
4.2
Apps that use location-based APIs for automatic or autonomous control of vehicles, aircraft, or other devices will be rejected
4.3
Apps that use location-based APIs for dispatch, fleet management, or emergency services will be rejected
5. Push notifications
5.1
Apps that provide Push Notifications without using the Apple Push Notification (APN) API will be rejected
5.2
Apps that use the APN service without obtaining a Push Application ID from Apple will be rejected
5.3 
Apps that send Push Notifications without first obtaining user consent will be rejected
5.4
 Apps that send sensitive personal or confidential information using Push Notifications will be rejected
5.5 
Apps that use Push Notifications to send unsolicited messages, or for the purpose of phishing or spamming will be rejected
5.6
 Apps cannot use Push Notifications to send advertising, promotions, or direct marketing of any kind
5.7 
Apps cannot charge users for use of Push Notifications
5.8 
Apps that excessively use the network capacity or bandwidth of the APN service or unduly burden a device with Push Notifications will be rejected
5.9
 Apps that transmit viruses, files, computer code, or programs that may harm or disrupt the normal operation of the APN service will be rejected
6. Game Center
6.1 
Apps that display any Player ID to end users or any third party will be rejected
6.2
 Apps that use Player IDs for any use other than as approved by the Game Center terms will be rejected
6.3 
Developers that attempt to reverse lookup, trace, relate, associate, mine, harvest, or otherwise exploit Player IDs, alias, or other information obtained through the Game Center will be removed from the iOS Developer Program
6.4
 Game Center information, such as Leaderboard scores, may only be used in apps approved for use with the Game Center
6.5 
Apps that use Game Center service to send unsolicited messages, or for the purpose of phishing or spamming will be rejected
6.6
 Apps that excessively use the network capacity or bandwidth of the Game Center will be rejected
6.7
 Apps that transmit viruses, files, computer code, or programs that may harm or disrupt the normal operation of the Game Center service will be rejected
7. iAds
7.1 
Apps that artificially increase the number of impressions or click-throughs of ads will be rejected
7.2 
Apps that contain empty iAd banners will be rejected
7.3 
Apps that are designed predominantly for the display of ads will be rejected
8. Trademarks and trade dress
8.1 
Apps must comply with all terms and conditions explained in the Guidelines for using Apple Trademark and Copyrights and the Apple Trademark List
8.2
 Apps that suggest or infer that Apple is a source or supplier of the app, or that Apple endorses any particular representation regarding quality or functionality will be rejected
8.3 
Apps which appear confusingly similar to an existing Apple product or advertising theme will be rejected
8.4 
Apps that misspell Apple product names in their app name (i.e., GPS for Iphone, iTunz) will be rejected
8.5
 Use of protected 3rd party material (trademarks, copyrights, trade secrets, otherwise proprietary content) requires a documented rights check which must be provided upon request
8.6 
Google Maps and Google Earth images obtained via the Google Maps API can be used within an application if all brand features of the original content remain unaltered and fully visible. Apps that cover up or modify the Google logo or copyright holders identification will be rejected
9. Media content
9.1
 Apps that do not use the MediaPlayer framework to access media in the Music Library will be rejected
9.2
 App user interfaces that mimic any iPod interface will be rejected
9.3 
Audio streaming content over a cellular network may not use more than 5MB over 5 minutes
9.4
 Video streaming content over a cellular network longer than 10 minutes must use HTTP Live Streaming and include a baseline 64 kbps audio-only HTTP Live stream
10. User interface
10.1 
Apps must comply with all terms and conditions explained in the Apple iPhone Human Interface Guidelines and the Apple iPad Human Interface Guidelines
10.2
 Apps that look similar to apps bundled on the iPhone, including the App Store, iTunes Store, and iBookstore, will be rejected
10.3 
Apps that do not use system provided items, such as buttons and icons, correctly and as described in the Apple iPhone Human Interface Guidelines and the Apple iPad Human Interface Guidelines may be rejected
10.4 
Apps that create alternate desktop/home screen environments or simulate multi-app widget experiences will be rejected
10.5 
Apps that alter the functions of standard switches, such as the Volume Up/Down and Ring/Silent switches, will be rejected
10.6 
Apple and our customers place a high value on simple, refined, creative, well thought through interfaces. They take more work but are worth it. Apple sets a high bar. If your user interface is complex or less than very good it may be rejected
11. Purchasing and currencies
11.1 
Apps that unlock or enable additional features or functionality with mechanisms other than the App Store will be rejected
11.2
 Apps utilizing a system other than the In App Purchase API (IAP) to purchase content, functionality, or services in an app will be rejected
11.3
 Apps using IAP to purchase physical goods or goods and services used outside of the application will be rejected
11.4 
Apps that use IAP to purchase credits or other currencies must consume those credits within the application
11.5 
Apps that use IAP to purchase credits or other currencies that expire will be rejected
11.6
 Content subscriptions using IAP must last a minimum of 30 days and be available to the user from all of their iOS devices
11.7 
Apps that use IAP to purchase items must assign the correct Purchasability type
11.8 
Apps that use IAP to purchase access to built-in capabilities provided by iOS, such as the camera or the gyroscope, will be rejected
11.9
 Apps containing “rental” content or services that expire after a limited time will be rejected
11.10 
Insurance applications must be free, in legal-compliance in the regions distributed, and cannot use IAP
11.11 
In general, the more expensive your app, the more thoroughly we will review it
12. Scraping and aggregation
12.1 
Applications that scrape any information from Apple sites (for example from apple.com, iTunes Store, App Store, iTunes Connect, Apple Developer Programs, etc) or create rankings using content from Apple sites and services will be rejected
12.2 
Applications may use approved Apple RSS feeds such as the iTunes Store RSS feed
12.3
 Apps that are simply web clippings, content aggregators, or a collection of links, may be rejected
13. Damage to device
13.1 
Apps that encourage users to use an Apple Device in a way that may cause damage to the device will be rejected
13.2 
Apps that rapidly drain the device’s battery or generate excessive heat will be rejected
14. Personal attacks
14.1 
Any app that is defamatory, offensive, mean-spirited, or likely to place the targeted individual or group in harms way will be rejected
14.2
 Professional political satirists and humorists are exempt from the ban on offensive or mean-spirited commentary
15. Violence
15.1
 Apps portraying realistic images of people or animals being killed or maimed, shot, stabbed, tortured or injured will be rejected
15.2
 Apps that depict violence or abuse of children will be rejected
15.3 
”Enemies” within the context of a game cannot solely target a specific race, culture, a real government or corporation, or any other real entity
15.4
 Apps involving realistic depictions of weapons in such a way as to encourage illegal or reckless use of such weapons will be rejected
15.5
 Apps that include games of Russian roulette will be rejected
16. Objectionable content
16.1 
Apps that present excessively objectionable or crude content will be rejected
16.2 
Apps that are primarily designed to upset or disgust users will be rejected
17. Privacy
17.1 
Apps cannot transmit data about a user without obtaining the user’s prior permission and providing the user with access to information about how and where the data will be used
17.2
 Apps that require users to share personal information, such as email address and date of birth, in order to function will be rejected
17.3 
Apps that target minors for data collection will be rejected
18. Pornography
18.1 
Apps containing pornographic material, defined by Webster’s Dictionary as “explicit descriptions or displays of sexual organs or activities intended to stimulate erotic rather than aesthetic or emotional feelings”, will be rejected
18.2
 Apps that contain user generated content that is frequently pornographic (ex “Chat Roulette” apps) will be rejected
19. Religion, culture, and ethnicity
19.1
 Apps containing references or commentary about a religious, cultural or ethnic group that are defamatory, offensive, mean-spirited or likely to expose the targeted group to harm or violence will be rejected
19.2
 Apps may contain or quote religious text provided the quotes or translations are accurate and not misleading. Commentary should be educational or informative rather than inflammatory
20. Contests, sweepstakes, lotteries, and raffles
20.1 
Sweepstakes and contests must be sponsored by the developer/company of the app
20.2
 Official rules for sweepstakes and contests, must be presented in the app and make it clear that Apple is not a sponsor or involved in the activity in any manner
20.3
 It must be permissible by law for the developer to run a lottery app, and a lottery app must have all of the following characteristics: consideration, chance, and a prize
20.4
 Apps that allow a user to directly purchase a lottery or raffle ticket in the app will be rejected
21. Charities and contributions
21.1
 Apps that include the ability to make donations to recognized charitable organizations must be free
21.2
 The collection of donations must be done via a web site in Safari or an SMS
22. Legal requirements
22.1 
Apps must comply with all legal requirements in any location where they are made available to users. It is the developer’s obligation to understand and conform to all local laws
22.2 
Apps that contain false, fraudulent or misleading representations will be rejected
22.3 
Apps that solicit, promote, or encourage criminal or clearly reckless behavior will be rejected
22.4
 Apps that enable illegal file sharing will be rejected
22.5
 Apps that are designed for use as illegal gambling aids, including card counters, will be rejected
22.6 
Apps that enable anonymous or prank phone calls or SMS/MMS messaging will be rejected
22.7
 Developers who create apps that surreptitiously attempt to discover user passwords or other private user data will be removed from the iOS Developer Program

Living document
This document represents our best efforts to share how we review apps submitted to the App Store, and we hope it is a helpful guide as you develop and submit your apps. It is a living document that will evolve as we are presented with new apps and situations, and we’ll update it periodically to reflect these changes.

Thank you for developing for iOS. Even though this document is a formidable list of what not to do, please also keep in mind the much shorter list of what you must do. Above all else, join us in trying to surprise and delight users. Show them their world in innovative ways, and let them interact with it like never before. In our experience, users really respond to polish, both in functionality and user interface. Go the extra mile. Give them more than they expect. And take them places where they have never been before. We are ready to help.